Analis Destiny (Aleix Bledel)

(no subject)

I play violin with my Youth Orchestra here in the grand old state of North Carolina, and we recently had our first concert of the season, which the senior orchestra opened with Egmont's Overture. I was so proud to have played that piece, and I admit I was worried about not doing it justice, but we played with such force... it was so amazing to be a part of! I hope we can play more Beethoven(I am heckling my conductor for us the play the Seventh Symphony because I am in love with the allegretto mvmt).
justme

(no subject)

Last night, I went to a St. Paul Chamber Orchestra concert (got two free tickets), and they played the Maestro's first, second, and fifth symphonies all in one night!!!!!

I am so happy right now, you can't even believe it!!
  • Current Music
    none right now
composing with fountain pen
  • karelia

Origin of Title?

I'm particularly interested in the origin/reason of the Appassionata and the Pathétique. Can anyone help me out here? I've googled with several approaches, but simply nothing comes up. Thanks
  • Current Music
    Pathétique - played by Brendel
Putin

Cantata on the Elevation of Leopold II

Having written about the Joseph II cantata, I should say something about the even more obscure sequel, the Cantata on the Elevation of Leopold II to the Imperial Dignity. I don't think it's up to the level of the earlier cantata, and it's a bit more conservative in style, but it's still very impressive for the pre-Vienna Beethoven.

It includes what I think is the first instance of Beethoven's torturing a soprano. The coloratura aria "Fliesse, Wohnezähre, fliesse!" goes on and on for over ten voice-wrecking minutes. I'm more impressed with the trio, "Ihr, die Joseph ihren Vater nannten." The way the voices answer one another hints at some later works. The final chorus is notable for the words "Stürzet nieder, Millionen," which must be the first clear allusion to the Ode to Joy in Beethoven's work. There's even a hint of the Ninth Symphony in the music.

If anyone's interested in tracking this recording down, it's on a 1995 Koch/Schwann CD, 3-1435-2. That's not a brand I've run into before, and may not be normally imported into the US.
Putin

Cantata on the Death of Joseph II

It's been over a decade since I listened to this piece. I used to have it on an LP -- in Latin, for no reason I can understand. Beethoven wrote it in 1790; that's before the Op. 2 piano sonatas. If people talk about it at all, they mention it as a sketch for Fidelio. But it's a wonderful work on its own, as I just rediscovered this week in borrowing a CD of it from the library for which I work.

It adds to it, hearing it in German. (Though, oddly, the soprano and the chorus disagree on how to pronounce the "J" in "Joseph.") Some of the words still fit today's world:

Ein Ungeheuer, sein Name Fanatismus,
Stieg aus den Tiefen der Hölle,
Dehnte sich zwischen Erd' und Sonne,
Und es ward Nacht!

The highlight is the aria with chorus, "Da stiegen die Menschen an's Licht." If you haven't heard it, you'd recognize it in a second; it's an early version of "O Gott, welch ein Augenblick" from Fidelio. It takes a few listenings to get away from Fidelio, which treats the material even more wonderfully, but this is wonderful music in itself. The first half is just the soprano singer with the orchestra; then the material is repeated with the chorus filling in behind the soloist, in a way quite a bit like the opera.

The CD also includes the Cantata on the Elevation of Leopold II, which I haven't listened to yet, and which I don't recall even having heard of previously.

Intro from a newbie

-Who you are
Vick. Slightly nerdy, suffering from severe addiction to classical music.

-Where you're from
India, originally. Currently living in Southern California.

-Why you are passionate about Beethoven
I don't know. Just cannot help it.

-How you first became interested in Beethoven
Coming from a different culture with its own rich music tradition, I didn't have much exposure to Beethoven (or classical music) beyond the odd snippets of Fur Elise/moonlight sonata clubbed within random other stuff in 'best of' collections.
After superficially listening to various genres of music for 25 yrs, one day I happened to be ambushed by the 2nd movement Allegretto from the seventh symphony. That was the first time a piece of music, and apparently such a simple one, had made me choke up. And this happened when I was not even paying full attention to it!

-Your favorite composition(s) by Beethoven
Late String Quartets, Op 18 No.1, Razumovsky quartets, symphonies: 3,5,6,7,9, piano sonatas, Piano Trio 'Archduke', Piano concerti 4&5, Violin concerto, Overtures Coriolan, Egmont, Leonore III...Brahms first symphony ;)
  • elevea

Hi, I'm new here...

O Freunde,

-Who you are
Nick, guitar player, 29 years and 11 months old.

-Where you're from
Gothenburg, Sweden

-Why you are passionate about Beethoven
Because no one has transformed music and the artist's image in the same way. Not to mention that no one has ever written such fantastic music.

-How you first became interested in Beethoven
It seemed that Beethoven had written all the classical pieces that I liked the most. The Pastoral Symphony really intrigued me, since I had no idea he could write such cheerful music.

-Your favorite composition(s) by Beethoven
Symphonies nos. 5, 6 and 9 (in no particular order), piano concerto no. 4, string quartet in B flat op. 130, piano sonatas in C minor op. 13 "Pathétique" and op. 53 in C, cello sonata in A op. 69.
  • Current Music
    Schubert - Symphony no. 8 in B minor

Hello, my name is...

-Who you are
A 29-year-old web geek, husband, father, dog-owner, etc.
 
-Where you're from
Spent the first 22 years of my life in western New York state, lived in the San Francisco Bay Area for six years, moved to western Maine last year.
 
-Why you are passionate about Beethoven
Because no other composer or musical artist, before or since, has so completely captured both the complexity and the universality of human existence in music.
 
-How you first became interested in Beethoven
Attended a performance of the Moonlight sonata when I was a teenager and found myself in tears at its beauty. Soon thereafter I acquired many more recordings and found the same to be true.
 
-Your favorite composition(s) by Beethoven
As I grow older, I find myself drawn more and more to his later works. The Hammerklavier sonata, particularly the third movement (and particularly the part about halfway through the movement where the tempo picks up, the left hand descends followed by the right hand playing those beautiful, straining, pleading notes... the part that starts around the bottom of this page and continues into this page and beyond). The last few string quartets are amazing as well. Also, Missa Solemnis is breathtaking. As for a favorite symphony, I'd have to go with the seventh or the ninth (or maybe the fifth, possibly the third...)
 
Anyway, glad to be aboard.