OPEN CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

OPEN CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS!

OTHER TONGUES: Mixed-Race Women Speak Out

Co-editors Adebe D.A. and Andrea Thompson are seeking submissions for an anthology of writing by and about mixed-race women of Black/white heritage, intended for publication in Fall 2010 by Inanna Publications.

The purpose of this anthology is to explore the question of how Black/white mixed-race women in North America identify in the 21st Century. The anthology will also serve as a place to learn about the social experiences, attitudes, and feelings of others, and what racial identity has come to mean today. We are inviting previously unpublished submissions that engage, document, and/or explore the experiences of being mixed-race, by placing interraciality as the center, rather than periphery, of analysis.

Please send one (1) submission of up to 2500 words of poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, or spoken word as a SINGLE attachment to othertonguesanthology@gmail.com

Black and white images and artwork should be 300 dpi and sent as attachments in jpg. of tiff. format. Artwork and photography limited to three (3) per applicant.

Please include your contact information, including your name, address, phone number, e-mail, title(s) of work submitted, type of submission, and a short artist bio (50 words max) in the body of the email, with your name and the type of submission in the subject line (e.g. “Jazmine – Poetry Submission”). All submissions are due April 15, 2010. Incomplete submissions will not be considered.

If you prefer that your contribution remain anonymous, please include this preference at the top of your submission. All personal information you provide will be kept strictly confidential.

For detailed submission guidelines and requirements, and the Editors' bios, please refer to the document that is attached to this email.

If you have any questions about this project, please contact the Editors, Adebe DeRango-Adem and Andrea Thompson, at othertonguesanthology@gmail.com

For more information: www.adebe.wordpress.com www.andreathompson.ca or visit us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=276479812662

We look forward to reviewing your submission!

(no subject)

And the Cracker of the Day Award goes to Keith Bardwell, justice of the pece in Tangipahoa Parish in LA, who denies interracial couples marriage licenses. He's even got the cred to back it up: black people use his john.

"I'm not a racist. I just don't believe in mixing the races that way," Bardwell told the Associated Press on Thursday. "I have piles and piles of black friends. They come to my home, I marry them, they use my bathroom. I treat them just like everyone else."

(no subject)

I thought everyone would appreciate a post that isn't spam for prescription meds.


I recently found out an LJ friend, like me, has a white mother who is all balls out bigoted. And I thought I was sailing this boat solo.

Seriously, like ranting about Mexicans and Jews...even black people.


Does this apply to any of you? Logic tells you, 'hey my mother/father married a non-white person and has a non 100% white child, s/he by extension should be more open-minded'.

Whoops, won't be making that mistake again.

I half-jokingly and on a whim created "Multiracials with a Racist Cracker Ass Parent". I'll likely end up deleting it, but in the off chance I've struck a chord, or hell even if I haven't and you'd like to join out of curiosity for other people's experiences, please feel free to join us, introduce yourself, etc.

Whether it ends up being a forum for this phenomena or just being biracial in general, it doesn't matter.



And just curious, what kind of hair do you folks have? I'm part 3A and part 2C. It's thick, dry, I have a shitload of it, and worst of all, the inconsistency of the curl (curlier on top and in the front) makes it look shapeless and unattractive. Not even using sulfate-free shampoo and apple cider vinegar lessens the dryness. Any tips?

Controversial issue, but I'll post it anyway

I've recently got into a very nasty argument about this to the point I was ran out of a community. I would like to discuss/rant about it.

In this society, the darker you are, the more you're looked down upon. It's an injustice which we should all rebel. I think this applies to mulattos too, because some are darker than others. We're not looked at as white in this society, so we don't get any perks.

However, some mulattos are lighter than others and lighter than black people. For example, I have medium skin (as you can see in my pic), so to some, I'm seen as a "safe" black person, especially because I was raised by a white family, so I "act white." My black relatives always rave about my hair and skin color, which is seen as "good." This always disturbed me -- is there really THAT much self-hatred in the black community?

Also, black guys seem to flirt with me a lot because I'm seen as "safe." I told this one black guy who was hitting on me on the bus to GTFO, but he said something to the level of that I'm not like "other" black girls. Meaning, I'm seen as "safe," while black women get the short end of the stick because of negative stereotypes attached to them. I feel very uncomfortable with this, and it's wrong to deny to date people because of their skin color. The media proclaims that dark skin is ugly and bad, and people are stupid enough to fall for it. It's a major injustice in our society.

I'm rarely hit on by white men. I know this mainly because of my race. Anybody who's dark is "ugly." I've been in many online discussions where people have said, "I don't like black women. They're unattractive because they have nappy hair, big lips, and big noses." WTF, right? And when I tell them that's bluntly racist and people shouldn't discriminate on the basis of race when it comes to dating, they just say, "It's just my preference," as if that makes it okay.

I know that all men aren't like this, and they see past the media's ignorance. But these are just my personal experiences living in Southern Indiana, a terrible place to live if you're not a white, heterosexual male who goes to a Christian church every Sunday. So, I'm screwed.

Luckily, in the GLBT community (I'm bi), I find more openness when it comes to dating outside your race. I guess this is because the GLBT community also doesn't fit into the fabric of society.

I talked about my experiences in the community I mentioned, only to be attacked and called "privileged." One woman actually name-dropped me in a post, saying that she's angry that black men find me attractive, and it made her feel unattractive. I can't help what I look like, and I can't help my experiences. About everybody has insecurities about their looks because the media's standard of "beauty" is ridiculous. I'm overweight myself. And that standard of "beauty" is also based on race. I hear awful stories about black/biracial women relaxing their hair and bleaching their skin. I went through a period of self-hatred myself. When I was little, I used to take many showers, washing the "blackness" off of me because one girl in school called me "dirty." Now, I embrace what I am, but because my skin is somewhat lighter, I'm "privileged."

Has anybody else run into this? I understand black women's anger when it comes to this, and they have every right to be angry. But I think they should aim that anger towards the right people, like the media, instead of lighter-skinned people. I felt so upset when I was called "privileged," because I've faced racism myself, being the only dark person in the community in which I grew up. The online community actually brought me to tears, and it made me so angry because of the accusations put on me.

Being a mulatto, you certainly don't fit into the white community, but you're either praised (for the wrong reasons) or looked down upon because of the color of your skin. Colorism is a difficult issue to face, but has anybody here faced this in the black community? Have you ever been called "good" because you're light? Have you ever felt the rage of some blacks because you're light?

I hate to get into this topic again, because I really don't want to have the same experiences that I had on the online community I mentioned. Hopefully, this is a safe spot. If you could enlighten me on something, I'd appreciate that as well.
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Hi!

[name]: Savannah
[where you live]: Indiana, United States
[siblings]: Two half-brothers, both white, but I consider them my brothers anyway.
[age]: 22
[what's it like being mulatto in your eyes]: It's like being interchangeable; about being everything. It's about counteracting the boundaries of race that society draws in between races.
[when and where did you first hear the word mulatto?]: Sometime when I was young. My father (who's black) said that I was one. I asked him what it meant, and he said it was about being two races. This was when I didn't quite grasp the issue of race yet; I didn't see black and white, but I was being told I was both.
[for what it's worth, do you ever really feel like you belong in a certain crowd?]: No, and I like it that way. I don't like being labeled or only being allowed to hang out with a certain group of people.

Looks like a good community :).
kills

an amazing book i need to recommend - Ace of Spades by David Matthews

this is my first posting. hello! my name is sarah, and i'm half black half jewish. my mother is jewish.

A friend of mine recommended a book called 'Ace of Spades' by David Matthews (you can find it here: http://tr.im/iGsu), and I love it so much. I'm half way through it and I can't believe how great this book is. It's so funny and personable. There are moments where I have to put the book down and just burst out laughing. But wow, is it well written! David Matthews is poetic with his words. Truly astounding.

Here's a brief description from The New Yorker:
The son of a Zionist white mother and a Malcolm X-admiring black father, Matthews, in this memoir, is a boy without a race in a city, Baltimore, that requires him to choose one. The story of racial pinball is not entirely unfamiliar: the black kids reject him as too light-skinned, the whites as too broad-nosed. But Matthews displays improvisational verve—blacks are "burnished" and "browned butter," and whites are anything from "alabaster" to "a puffy marshmallow in Baltimore’s steaming cup of cocoa"—and narrates with the vigor of a movie script. Indeed, it is on television that, as a child, he finds the clarity he yearns for. "I was a living contradiction of elements that shouldn’t have been," he writes at one point, whereas on TV "everything was black, or white, and a lot like life."

Really, i can't recommend this book more! I love it! Have you read it?


here's the author, david matthews:

helllo

[name] India Huff
[where you live] Miami, FL
[siblings] a much older half sister
[age] a little young, 16
[what's it like being mulatto in your eyes] I'm yet to encounter any negative feedback to my face, but I embrace every aspect of being mulatto namely the advantage of having a family that is so culturally different.
[when and where did you first hear the word mulatto?] Hm I think my freshman year in highschool one of my good friends used it to describe me
[for what it's worth, do you ever really feel like you belong in a certain crowd?] I have more white friends than black (ratio of 5:1) so I think I'm obliviously gravitate toward whites (I have also attended 'prestigious' private schools all my life - with overwhelmingly white populations) but i do NOT feel like I belong to a certain crowd.

pictures de moiCollapse )
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kills

an amazing book i need to recommend - Ace of Spades by David Matthews

this is my first posting. hello! my name is sarah, and i'm half black half jewish. my mother is jewish.

A friend of mine recommended a book called 'Ace of Spades' by David Matthews (you can find it here: http://tr.im/iGsu), and I love it so much. I'm half way through it and I can't believe how great this book is. It's so funny and personable. There are moments where I have to put the book down and just burst out laughing. But wow, is it well written! David Matthews is poetic with his words. Truly astounding.

Here's a brief description from The New Yorker:
The son of a Zionist white mother and a Malcolm X-admiring black father, Matthews, in this memoir, is a boy without a race in a city, Baltimore, that requires him to choose one. The story of racial pinball is not entirely unfamiliar: the black kids reject him as too light-skinned, the whites as too broad-nosed. But Matthews displays improvisational verve—blacks are "burnished" and "browned butter," and whites are anything from "alabaster" to "a puffy marshmallow in Baltimore’s steaming cup of cocoa"—and narrates with the vigor of a movie script. Indeed, it is on television that, as a child, he finds the clarity he yearns for. "I was a living contradiction of elements that shouldn’t have been," he writes at one point, whereas on TV "everything was black, or white, and a lot like life."

Really, i can't recommend this book more! I love it! Have you read it?

(no subject)

I am doing a campaign to be a fresh face with Marcelle. They have chosen me as a semi-finalist for a trip to New York with friends (which could be you!!) However, I can only be chosen if you VOTE FOR ME!

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